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HSCI 101: Introduction to Health Care Professions

How to Determine if a Source is Scholarly?

To determine if your sources are scholarly -- usually peer reviewed, you will need to do some research. Keep in mind that while databases do contain scholarly sources, not all sources in a database are scholarly -- think book reviews, opinion pieces, speeches, working papers. Here are a few things to consider when evaluating a source:

To determine if a source is scholarly, you will need to do a bit of evaluation of the source. While the library provides access to databases and databases to contain scholarly sources, not all sources within a database are scholarly -- think book reviews, opinion pieces, working papers. Here are a few things to consider: 

Author Publisher Audience Content Timeliness

Are author names provided?

Who is the publisher of the information? Who is the intended audience? Are sources cited within the text?  When was the item published? 

Are the authors' credentials provided?

Is the publisher an academic institution, scholarly or professional organization? Is the language specific to those with knowledge of a specific discipline? If the sources are cited, where are those sources from? How frequently is the journal published?
Are the credentials relevant to the information? What is the purpose for publishing this information?   Are conclusions based on evidence? How recently was the web page updated?
Are the authors connected to professional organizations? What is the process for getting published?    Is there a bibliography or works cited? Have other publications referenced this source?

 

Best Bests for Locating a Journal Article